15
Feb

An Introduction To Digital Signage In Health Care

As the system is struggling to cope under the weight of paper, on the horizon is a simpler, self-serve system just waiting to alleviate the problems within this over burdened sector. A physician can then do what he does best and that is concentrate on his patient, without sifting through reams of paper to diagnose and prescribe. A patient and doctor relationship can not be replaced by a computer, but it can effectively aide the medical profession by cutting down on multi page forms, in triplicate at the very least.

Trillions of dollars are being unnecessarily spent on ink and writing materials, which should be constructively spent on vital software instead – can you imagine your doctor drowning under a sea of papers? It is of course legislation and law that protects us, but it can be dealt with in an objective and positive way instead. The initial stage is to input the patient’s data and link it with the medical provider, then as it is collated and logged on the system, it has less chance of being ‘lost’ – you know how pieces of paper get ‘lost’ when they should be filed and how this information is of a very private and confidential nature. Although we all know sensitive data has previously been accessed by unscrupulous individuals, it is far less common than that of a piece of paper.

For a while now, many computerised systems have been used in health care, however it is now time for the patient to be in control, thus empowering the patient and giving them freedom of choice of their medical care. Where wireless tablets and/or patient kiosks have been trialled, it has had a positive effect on the health service all round – staff work load is drastically reduced and the patient is dealt with quickly and efficiently and on his way.

LCD Enclosure Global – anything else is a compromise.

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